Video

The NHS: A Visual Essay from juniordoctorblog.com

#voteNHS #GE2017

Please share widely and vote wisely.

 

UPDATE:

To address specific comments to the above point by point juniordoctorblog presents a new series: Fact Check the NHS.

Episode 1: Immigrants


juniordoctorblog.com

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18 thoughts on “The NHS: A Visual Essay from juniordoctorblog.com

  1. This is great – very clear and informative. But rather than ending “What are you going to do about it?” please give us some action guidelines. I want to help but don’t know how I best can (I live in a solidly safe Tory seat so my election vote won’t have much effect).

  2. This is awesome, but is there / can there be an image version where I can just scroll down on a web page to read it? I find the pacing of the video to be quite slow in a few places… 10 minutes is a really long time. 😦 Sorry to be demanding, great work though!

  3. What a wonderful job! I just realised writing this that tears were rolling down my face at the devastating calculated demise of the most amazing collective achievement of our species. A beacon of hope and human solidarity without precedence wantonly dismembered and thrown away to the dogs. Thank you so much for your talent and commitment to your calling!

  4. As a retired NHS manager I watched this with interest; it confirms my worst fears. One comment, it’s a long time since I studied statistics and there is a great deal of information to digest in this blog. It moves too quickly to absorb all the data, possibly my IT skills are not adequate but if it is possible to slow it down it would be easier to digest, BUT congratulations on preparing and publishing this.

  5. Hi. Love the video, but PLEASE you must list sources for all your charts and statistics to both increase credibility and to prevent opponents from undermining your arguments. As the animation is already done, put all your sources in the description with timecode bookmarks and links to online sources, and add overlay clickable comment links to sources in the video as it plays.

  6. The piece is very succinct and begins well with factual non-ideologically-tilted facts. It unfortunately strays from this objectivity as it proceeds. For example, it is clearly shown at minute 3.35 that spending on the NHS has risen relentlessly. And is now at its highest ever, serving more people than ever (survival+immigration?) who live healthier for longer than ever, and get better treatment for any disease than ever. . But then it slides into comparisons of “the possibilities.. * spending as a portion of GDP has fallen since 2007, it correctly states. This implies a) that GDP has risen steadily, and b) that money spent on healthcare is important AS A PROPORTION OF WHAT WE MAKE. The” Cuts” ideology then kicks in hard, at minute 6.06, by claiming we are therefore “underfunding” healthcare., because we COULD spend more.. . I believe we could also spend less, in many ways, and get more healthcare for our money. The piece agrees that our NHS is safe, effective, and cost-effective even at 6.7% GDP. Unlike the USA, which is unsafe, ineffective for millions excluded, and very cost-INeffective with dreadful value-for-money despite spending a very high proportion of its GDP. Our system is fundamentally very sound, but could be improved. Although the writer stated “you may be happy with private provision”, his objectivity then degenerates further into the “private vs public” side-issue mantra, without any attempt to discuss central issues of safety quality or value-for-money for each of our tax-pounds spent, in the clear attempt to purchase universal healthcare free at the point of use according to health needs of our people. We need not only to be better informed of the facts, but to think through the ideological issues more intelligently with less preformed political prejudice and RELIGIOUS FERVOUR, as the Nordic people do. We could certainly spend more of our GDP on healthcare. In my view we should.. But we should spend it more wisely, more on social care provision, and health prevention, and much less on excessively expensive drugs and specialist care (which should always be rigorously challenged for VfM, and nowadays whether it is even necessary). 😦

  7. The piece is very succinct and begins well with objective non-ideologically-tilted facts. It unfortunately strays from this objectivity as it proceeds. For example, it is clearly shown at minute 3.35 that spending on the NHS has risen relentlessly. And is now at its highest ever, serving more people than ever (survival+immigration?) who live healthier for longer than ever, and get better treatment for any disease than ever. . But then it slides into comparisons of “the possibilities.. * spending as a portion of GDP has fallen since 2007, it correctly states. This implies a) that GDP has risen steadily, and b) that money spent on healthcare is important AS A PROPORTION OF WHAT WE MAKE. The” Cuts” ideology then kicks in hard, at minute 6.06, by claiming we are therefore “underfunding” healthcare., because we COULD spend more.. . I believe we could also spend less, in many ways, or spend it differently e.g. on social care and prevention, and get more healthcare for our money. But clearly something has gone badly wrong at the sharp end of A&E, exacerbated by many many factors. Yet we see more people in A&E within 4 hours than ever.. But there are even more going over 4 hours, waiting on trolleys for beds, or waiting for discharge packages. The piece agrees that our NHS remains safe, effective, and cost-effective at 8% GDP (NOT the projected 6.7% GDP) so it is NOT breaking. Unlike the USA, which is unsafe, ineffective for millions excluded, and very cost-INeffective with dreadful value-for-money despite spending a very high proportion of its GDP. Our system is fundamentally very sound, but could be improved. Although the writer stated “you might not mind healthcare private provision”, his objectivity then degenerates further into the “private vs public” side-issue mantra, talking about non-existent “sell-offs” instead of contracts, without any attempt to answer his own “WHy?” by tackling the central issues of safety quality and value-for-money for each of our tax-pounds spent, in the clear NHS-led attempt to purchase universal healthcare free at the point of use according to health needs of our people… We need not only to be better informed of the facts, but to think through the ideological issues more intelligently with less preformed political prejudice and RELIGIOUS FERVOUR, as the Nordic people do. We could certainly spend more of our GDP on healthcare. In my view we should.. But we should spend it more wisely, more on social care provision, and health prevention, and much less on excessively expensive drugs and specialist care (which should always be rigorously challenged for VfM, and nowadays whether it is even necessary). I believe this will mean a mixed economy, fully funded through taxation. I do not believe the NHS executive is deliberately trying to destroy the NHS on purpose, nor do I believe we should throw money at them without clear and credible improvement plans.

  8. Walmart and McDonalds are corporations therefore privately funded thus the NHS is the third largest public funded employer. I think that defence gets a larger budget in the US – the biggest public employer…so even being the fifth largest employer – its without the benefits of the 4 ahead!

  9. Love this – thank you. I’ll be sharing it a lot between now and the election. A Facebook friend did point out though how difficult it is for the visually impaired and suggested an audio description would help.

  10. I wouldn’t worry,with Donald Trump in charge of the nuclear codes and Britain with its pet trident project another couple of years we’ll be at medieval levels of population.Problem solved.

  11. thank you Dominic , for raising awareness (in a big way!) of the potential and current plight of our NHS with your engaging, enlightening and informative.video.
    peace

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